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Gamification and Creativity in STEAM Education Conference: 17-18 Jan 2019

Page history last edited by Cecilia 3 years, 5 months ago

AIMS

The aims of this conference are to develop and continue discussions on STEAM Education Research at this time focusing on different aspects of gamification and creativities. The presentations at the conference will enable us to learn about the work of colleagues locally and internationally to be able to develop collaborations in STEAM related projects. This time we would like to further explore the role of Gamification and Creativity in STEAM education and advance our knowledge in supporting creative environments for learning. Thus, we hope that not only researchers, but also artists, teachers, teaching specialists and anyone wish to contribute to the topics will join us.

 

 

INVITED SPEAKERS

 

Selay Arkün Kocadere, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey - Gamification: An old friend in a new frame

 

Marta Barbarics, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary - Possible Uses of Gamification in Education

 

Hans-Georg Weigand, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany -  STEAM in a Mathematics Laboratory – Experiments, Animations and Simulations in the real and virtual World

 

 

REGISTRATION

We encourage colleagues to register for the conference as soon as possible and submit abstracts (max 200 words, each talk can be 10min+ 5min for questions) by 13 January 2019:  

 

PLANNED PROGRAMME

 

Thursday - 17 January 2019

JKU Linz, Room S2-416

09:00 - 10:00 – Keynote - Selay Arkün Kocadere

10:00 - 10:30 - Presentations, discussing STEAM Education Research (Dana-Picard & Hershkovitz)

10:30 - 11:00 – Coffee break

11:00 – 12:00 – Presentations, discussing STEAM Education Research (FenyvesiKröhnWeinhandl  & SchallertOtto)

12:00 – 13:00 – Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 – Keynote - Hans-Georg Weigand

14:00 - 15:30 - Presentations, discussing STEAM Education Research (OakesBudinskiRussoTrappmairZöchbauerVitabar)

15:30 – 16:00 – Coffee break

16:00 – 17:30 – Presentations, Future projects and closing (AndreGalambos, CrillyKristinsdóttirBekesi, Vass, Lieban)

Right after this session, those who are interested can join a game session with Eduardo Pompermayer and Diego Lieban. 

19:00- Dinner in the City Centre (Restaurant StadtLiebe - https://goo.gl/maps/ow7uULtpCXJ2 ) - Please sign up during the day to know the number for reservation

 

Friday – 18 January 2019

JKU Linz, Room S2 - 416

09:00 - 10:00 – Keynote - Marta Barbarics

10:00 - 10:30 - Presentations, discussing STEAM Education Research (PompermayerJaeger,Andjic )

10:30 - 11:00 – Coffee break

11:00 – 12:00 – Presentations, discussing STEAM Education Research (Shillo, Bini, Ponce Campuzano, Pikalova, Kiladze, Lichtenegger )

12:00 – 13:00 – Lunch

13:00 - open discussions, optional campus/city excursions

 

LOCATION

Directions: JKU Linz, Altenbergerstr 69, 4040 Linz
JKU Campus Map

 

PUBLICATION OF PAPERS

Publications of papers is possible in the K-12 STEM Education Journal 

Please contact Zsolt for further details 

 

ACCOMMODATION

Budget Accommodation is available at the Sommerhaus Hotel: http://www.sommerhaus-hotel.at/en/linz or Harry's Home Hotel https://www.harrys-home.com/en/linz/rooms-prices/

You can connect the hotel directly stating that you are attending the Creativity in STEAM Education Conference (code: STEAM Education) and receive a discounted price.

If you have any difficulties with the accommodation you can contact: Barbara Fröhlich <Barbara.Froehlich@jku.at>

 

ONLINE STREAMING AND PARTICIPATION

You can also follow the conference online on JKU STEM Facebook page:

https://appear.in/jku-stem

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWyTRzOHCcyjVk7lCvvoEZw?view_as=subscriber

 

Photos

https://photos.app.goo.gl/h9etoJ4JGgbADBCx8

 

 

 

Registered Participants

 

Martin Andre Pedagogical University Tyrol & JKU Austria
Noah (Thierry) Dana-Picard Jerusalem College of Technology Israel
Sara Hershkovitz Center for Educational Technology, Tel Aviv Israel
Georg Grasegger RICAM Austria
Elizabeth Crilly Leeds University England
Lilla Korenova Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Education Slovakia
Corinna Kröhn JKU Austria
Robert Weinhandl JKU Linz Österreich
Marina Rottenhofer JKU Linz AT
Dominic Oakes FMSP Wales/Swansea University UK
Peter Galambos Óbuda University Hungary
Giulia Bini Università degli Studi di Torino Italia
Natalija Budinski JKU Serbia
Kristof Fenyvesi University of Jyväskylä Finland
Bjarnheiður Kristinsdóttir University of Iceland Iceland
Ibolya Veress-Bágyi University of Debrecen Hungary
Clemens Jaeger   Austria
Stefanie Schallert JKU Linz Austria
Juan Carlos Ponce Campuzano The University of Queensland Australia
Roi Shillo Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Israel
Kalman Bekesi Educational Authority Budapest Hungary
Eduardo Pompermayer Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio Grande do Sul - Canoas Brasil
Branko Andjic University of Montenegro Montenegro
Diego Lieban IFRS-Brazil / JKU-Austria Brazil
Cecilia Russo Johannes Kepler University Uruguay
Andreas Trappmair JKU Linz Austria
Johanna Zöchbauer JKU Austria
Valentyna Pikalova National Technical University "Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute" (NTU "KhPI") Украина
Clemens Jaeger JKU Linz Austria
Korbinian Otto JKU Austria
Fabián Vitabar Johannes Kepler University Uruguay

 

Titles and Abstracts

Last Name First Name Institution Country Co-author Title Abstract

 Arkün Kocadere

 Selay 

Hacettepe University 

Turkey 

 

Gamification: An old friend in a new frame 

Gamification, integrating game elements into learning process, seems to be one of the most popular teaching methods nowadays. It has a wide application area, starting from elementary school to higher education, including online classes. Its potential could be valued for improving learning outcomes, for assessment, as well as for solving educational administrative issues. The aim of this talk is to take a closer look at existing research in order to understand the effect of gamification in education and to be aware of the game elements which can take place in gamification design. Supported with implication examples, the talk will include the design of gamified learning environments in accordance with player types. The talk will end by questioning the assumed underlying learning theory and evaluation of gamification considering the 21st century student standards.

Barbarics

Marta 

Eotvos Lorand University

Hungary

 

Possible Uses of Gamification in Education

Gamification, the use of game design elements in non-game contexts, has gained substantial attention in the past decade. Both game design elements and non-game contexts have a huge variety and a great number of applications from business to education through all fields of life. The non-game context of this presentation is education and the focus is the use of some possible applications of gamification in education with special attention to STEAM. After a brief summary of the history of gamification in education, micro-gamification projects and more complex gamified processes are presented through research carried out in Hungary. Finally, gamification is linked to the skills needed in the development of the 21st century one of which is creativity.

Weigand

 

Hans-Georg

University of Wuerzburg Germany   STEAM in a Mathematics Laboratory – Experiments, Animations and Simulations in the real and virtual World The Mathematics Laboratory at the University of Wuerzburg allows high school and university students to experiment with real and virtual models of real-life situations and mathematics phenomena via a guided tree-hour-tour of discovery. Examples are an excavator, a windscreen wiper, parking a car or analyzing geometric art, but also working with mathematical instruments like a parabola or an ellipse drawer. The students should see and understand the mathematics inside these models and they should learn to see their environment with different, mathematical, sometimes engineering eyes. The talk gives examples of the laboratory and shows the development of creativity in the frame of a limited real and virtual world.  

 

 

 

Last Name First Name Institution Country Title Co-author Abstract
Andjic Branko University of Montenegro Montenegro
Dichotomous key as teaching tools for developing the student's creativity in primary school
 
The huge number of research are confirmed the positive effect of implementation of the dichotomous keys (DK) on students achievement in biology. However, still are very rare research which examines the students' ability to create DK. In this research, the students were asked to create the DK's for several organisms from their surroundings. The result shows the DK as a part of Inquiry-based education involves basic processes that give rise to student’s creativity. The student’s which used DK are showed more different approach in identification organism’s from the surrounding’s as well as in creating the DK than student which the same content was learned on the traditional way.
Andre Martin Pedagogical University Tyrol & JKU Austria
Visualizations make data meaningful: Technologies in modern statistics education
 
Graphical representations of data facilitate revealing and exploring hidden phenomena that can not be discovered without statistical lenses. Making data meaningful implies illustrating complex relationships with clearness and simplicity. In our data society, it is commonly agreed that communication skills, creativity and innovation as well as critical-thinking and problem-solving, with a focus on processing information, are crucial components for citizenship in the 21st century. Therefore, modern statistics education must contribute to give coherent responses to the developments in the digital age. In this presentation, examples and good practices of current and future concepts to integrate data visualization of Open Data in secondary school education will be highlighted. In addition, directions for further development and research in this field will be outlined. Moreover, approaches to statistics education beyond conventional boundaries are depicted. Finally, with a focus on methods to visually analyse real data, connections between graphical representations of data and intuitive understanding of statistical concepts are drawn.
Bekesi Kalman Educational Authority Budapest Hungary How Written Curricula Or Teaching Resources Can Support Effective Science Teaching: Indicators Balazs Szalay, Ildiko Balazsi, Agnes Lak
Besides the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts, there are generic skills that are of growing importance. Some claim that general or transversal skills ensure the ability to expertise in a new field quickly therefore their importance is greater than the content of any curriculum. Among others, such skills are asking questions, testing assumptions, constructing knowledge by collaborating with peers or being able to reflect on their own thinking by metacognition. Still, curricula and textbooks are important mediator of not only content but expectations of transversal skills as well. Textbooks still play key role in top-down educational reforms (Pepin et al., 2013)

However, the original research question was not about generic skills. We started looking for learning and teaching strategies and methods that are proven (by research evidence) to have a positive effect on student. An extensive and systematic literature review has been conducted on quantitative or mixed, meta-studies and large-scale studies, published in English globally. At this point we have processed about 1000 articles which represent more than 16000 hits on the systematic online search lists (by stratified sampling). Our search included terms like “effectiveness”, “systematic review”, “effect size”, “science teaching” and “secondary school”. The full list contained a systematically mapped out list of relevant search terms and search operators.

The majority of the publications were about improving generic or transversal skills and thus affecting students’ test results rather than particular concepts, knowledge and understanding in science. The approach to teaching strategies and techniques is whether they are proven to support these generic skills.

Our research question is “What pedagogies should be presented and implied in national and local curricula as well as teaching and learning resources to support these effective strategies, techniques or methods?” Our indicators reflect much more on generic and transversal skills improvement than on specific content of physics or chemistry. This research doesn’t intend to cover all possible generic and transversal skills but only those that are quantitatively proven to contribute to measurable student performance.

In the Linz Gamification and Creativity in STEAM Education Conference on 17-18 January 2019, I am going to present some of the preliminary findings. We have coded and analysed science national curricula (England and Wales, and Hungary). We also have processed data from textbooks and teachers’ guides. The interpretation of data was conducted along a) discovery learning (constructivist pedagogies) vs. structured teaching (behaviouristic pedagogies), b) metacognitive skills, and c) cognitive domains. These aspects of analysis also reflect on some cross-dimensions such as collaborative learning, problem-solving techniques and self-regulated or independent learning.

First results show that curricula have turned to a constructivist direction but try to keep behaviouristic traditions as well. A combination of the two is also suggested by literature (Furtak et al., 2012) However, they don’t always follow those pedagogies consistently that the mass of empirical literature suggests as “most effective ways”. On one hand, curricula don’t always include all the necessary learning objectives that may – for example – lead to understanding the nature of science, but only some elements of it. On the second hand, it is not always clear whether progressive elements written in curricular expectations are separate or they work as a system of expectations increasing each other’s impact on students’ skills. Textbooks and other resources we analysed also represent an intention to turn towards constructivist learning with similar strengths and weaknesses as curricula do.

Referenced Literature
Pepin, B., Gueudet, G. és Trouche, L. (2013) Investigating Textbooks as Crucial Interfaces Between Culture, Policy and Teacher Curricular Practice: Two Contrasted Case Studies in France and Norway. ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 45 (5), 685-698.
Furtak, E. M., Seidel, T., Iverson, H., & Briggs, D. C. (2012) Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching: A Meta-Analysis. Review of Educational Research. [Online] 82 (3), 300–329.
Bini Giulia Università degli Studi di Torino Italia Creativity in class: mathematical memes as tools to initiate learning Ornella Robutti
The aim of this project is to explore the didactic affordances of memes (humorous digital objects, created by users and shared virally on the web) as cultural artefacts to learn mathematics, within the theoretical frameworks of boundary objects, commognition, and emotions in learning.
Due to their creative and involving nature, we can imagine diverse educational uses of memes: knowledge review, collective discussion, flipped classroom, inclusive teaching among others.
This study aims to observe the didactic affordances of the image memes, focusing on their use as tools to systematize knowledge, with attention to cognitive and non-cognitive aspects, such as the effects of the openness to humour, creativity and emotions in a subject traditionally distant from these elements and of the updating of the teacher-student relationship, thanks to the two-way exchange triggered by memes (teachers learning memes while students learning maths).
To reach our purpose, we have conceived a replicable teaching experience where students create multimedia learning objects that, starting from memes, range over several representational registers of a selected mathematical concept: a short video, which has the didactic purpose of eliciting the mathematical content, and a symbolic or graphic representation of the same content, created using GeoGebra.
The scaffolding to replicate this teaching experience will be shared in the conference, hoping to engage teachers and colleagues to join us in our journey in this unexplored field.
Budinski Natalija JKU Serbia
Mathematics, origami and technology in education based on creativity and innovations
 
It is evident that we need new educational strategies in order to prepare students for the technology based future. In this presentation we highlight innovative ideas of unconventional combination of disciplines, such as mathematics, origami and technology in the classroom. We share experience and observations gained during implementation of origami in teaching mathematics and technology, where we conveyed not only desired content, but developed their creativity as well.
Crilly Elizabeth Leeds University England Competence Profiles of Physicists None To be submitted
Dana-Picard Noah (Thierry) Jerusalem College of Technology/ Center for Educational Technology, Tel Aviv Israel Computer assisted activities about the Golden Ratio in Space and Time Sara Hershkovitz
The Golden Ratio appears not only in plane geometrical settings. It appears in spatial structure and in time related topics. We present CAS and DGS assisted activities with in-service and pre-service teachers in various settings, some of them are connected to space exploration.
Fenyvesi Kristof University of Jyväskylä Finland
Nurturing Collaborative Creativities and Innovation by Phenomenon-based Approach in STEAM Learning
 
The presentation will introduce some of our on-going projects, which are addressing the advancement of creative approaches and innovative communities in the school. The perspectives and attitudes, methods, technologies and learning tools developed by the Everyday Creativity E+ (https://creativeschools.eu/), the STIMEY H2020 (www.stimey.eu) and the Checkpoint Leonardo Network (https://www.jyu.fi/science/fi/luma/hankkeet/checkpoint-leonardo-network) Finnish national project are intended to enhance collaboration, motivation and engagement and contribute to innovative learning environments (https://www.jyu.fi/it/en/research/research-areas/cognitive-science-and-educational-technology/ile).
Galambos Peter Óbuda University Hungary A Serious Game for Schoolchild and Engineers: Programming Industrial Robots with Blockly János Tobik
Programming robots are quite appealing when motivating children to learn coding. For this reason, several frameworks appeared that introduces the fundamental programming concepts through visual components. Blockly is an open source project of Google, which provides a flexible and generic tool to implement customized graphical programming environments for any purpose, for example, programming tiny toy robots.

But why only toys could be operated through such a visual environment? Visual frameworks could be equally useful and efficient for developing programs for real industrial robots.

In my talk, I introduce the initial results of our project that is aimed at providing a Blockly-based programming framework for the popular Universal Robots industrial manipulators. The system consists of a web-based composer and a 3D simulator powered by MaxWhere. The original URSim virtual controller performs the execution of the robot program.
Jaeger Clemens JKU Linz Austria
Supporting children from socio-economic disadvantaged homes with free private coaching following the principles of Deliberate Practise
 
In all countries and economies that participated in PISA 2015, socio-economic status has a large influence on students’ performance in science, reading and mathematics. The gap in science scores between disadvantaged and advantaged 15-year-old students represents the equivalent of about three full years of schooling. One suggested approach to help mitigate the problem is that people in local communities provide after-school remedial support for students in need. Some of the recommendations of how this coaching should be conducted show similarities to the concept of "Deliberate Practise (DP)", which was developed by Anders Ericsson. The insights of his studies of professional expertise range from the characteristics of ideal training environments with teachers and coaches, to the methods of fostering motivation by providing emotional support and attainable training tasks of a suitable difficulty level. The aim of the talk is to present the planned PhD thesis, that wants to analyse successful initiatives (for example “JUMP Math” in Canada) and the scientific background of DP to design a training (possibly including gamification techniques) for voluntary coaches who are going to provide tutoring to children from socio-economic disadvantaged homes.
Kristinsdóttir Bjarnheiður University of Iceland Iceland
Toward a definition of silent video tasks
 
In my talk I will describe the development process of assigning silent video tasks and the criteria a video must fulfill to be eligible to be used as a silent video task. Some preliminary results regarding the use of silent video tasks in four different Icelandic upper secondary school mathematics classrooms were presented at the last Linz STEAM Education conferences, at PME42 in Umeå and at MEDA in Copenhagen in 2018. These presentations were focused on, respectively, creativity, the teachers’ role in assigning tasks and using technology in mathematics classrooms. During the discussion at these conferences, it became clear that a more precise definition of the silent videos and the silent video tasks was needed. This presentation presents results of further work towards such definitions.
Kröhn Corinna JKU Austria JKU COOL LAB - A Cross-curricular Teaching-Learning-Lab
B. Sabitzer, K. Otto, M. Rottenhofer, C. Kröhn, H. Demarle-Meusel

The COOL Lab is a meeting point for teaching, learning, research and practice, which mainly aims at fostering digital literacy and computational thinking as fundamental skills

for everyone and enhancing teaching at all levels. In contrast to other learning or teaching labs the COOL Lab interlaces initial teacher education, in-service training, research and teaching practice with school practice in primary and secondary education.

Lichtenegger Barbara JKU Austria How do you turn STEM projects into STEAM projects? Add the Arts!    
Lieban Diego IFRS-Brazil / JKU-Austria Brazil
Creating with 3D printing: linking physical and digital ways of learning
 
We intend to share a range of perspectives in using 3D printing as educational tool considering related pedagogies and the benefits of digital and physical resources connection. From game design to daily-life problem solving demands, our main goal is to spread some ideas highlighting the creative process and learning opportunities. The use of manipulative, as well as such approaches that favor different learning modes will be outlined.
Oakes Dominic FMSP Wales/Swansea University UK
Bringing a connected curriculum to life
 
Programmes of Study tend to work through specifications topic by topic. Can we improve on this in developing mathematical thinking by looking at the connections in the material and travelling through the mathematics in a different way? FMSP Wales have written SoWs for the new Mathematics & Further Mathematics A-Levels. We have mapped prior & dependent topics for every topic in the syllabi. Can we use this resource to grow our students' (& teachers') understanding of the patterns running through mathematics?

Our MindMap is complicated - it has to be printed on A0 paper to be at all legible! We are now working with Glyndwr University to develop a 3-D version of the MindMap. We are working towards using the Unreal Game Engine to allow students and teachers to travel through the curriculum. This will also allow the opportunity to develop games within the connected curriculum.
Otto Korbinian JKU Austria modelling for discovery learning Barbara Sabitzer, Marina Rottenhofer
The human brain is an amazing pattern-recognition machine. We already start using pattern recognition before kindergarten, like building toy houses, and use it later in our daily life, such as reading the bus map. Models are using patterns to simplify complex processes and relations for example, complicated bonds between big companies and their affiliated companies or charts for different operations on complex machines. The authors are using four different key models, which were the most viable types to teach a great variety of topics at different school subjects using pattern recognition. To create a model of a complex subject, a student needs to cull all the necessary information, has to understand the relations and/or processes and to make a coherent model out of the data. If there is a pending test, the student can use his model to get the necessary information without reading the whole chapter again. This paper presents the most important models, how they can be used in school, the selection procedure of choosing the accurate model for the subject and examples of the recently completed workshops at a secondary school in Linz.
Pikalova Valentyna National Technical University "Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute" (NTU "KhPI") Украина
STEAM project: Exploring and Modelling Ukrainian Embroidery

Oksana Hrytsenko

Iryna Rusina

 
In the STEAM project students explore traditional forms of Ukrainian embroidery and design new one with the help of GeoGebra and Python. One group of students works with GeoGebra in order to focus on exploring patterns through math topics involved: symmetry, geometrical transformation, tessellation etc. As a result we designed GeoGebra program with the set of tools to model unique patterns of Ukrainian embroidery. Another group focused on exploring repeating patterns in embroidery. As a result students designed embroidery generator program in Python, which models step-by-step process of implementing different cross stitch techniques to chosen pattern using turtle graphics Python library.
Pompermayer Eduardo Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio Grande do Sul - Canoas Brasil Modern Board Games: Developing Multiple Intelligence João Emilio Soares Michalski
Howard Gardner, an American psychologist, published the book Structures of Mind (1983) which shows, without opposing the scientific concepts of intelligence that there are seven models of intelligence. He further states in his theory that these intelligences could be developed and explored equally. They are visual and spatial intelligence, musical intelligence, linguistics, intelligence logical-mathematical intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, and bodily or kinesthetic intelligence. In the current Brazilian education system, students are developed and demanded, preferably linguistic intelligence and logical-mathematical intelligence, making it difficult to develop other intelligences that are of equivalent importance to others. Because of this, the Games Workshop, which is in its third year, seeks to develop through multiple board games, the exercise of multiple intelligences, with IFRS Campus Canoas students, for future professional and personal lives. The workshop happens once a week with a duration of 3 hours, always in the reverse shift. The counselor and the scholarship holders previously choose the games for each meeting. These are selected in order to work on some of the intelligences and also, whenever possible, that they have some theme related to the contents of propedeutic disciplines present in the curricula of the integrated courses. For example, we have that some games may be cooperative, so we can work interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. In addition, the project has sought to make games become part of the day-to-day life of the institution. For this, we have sought partnerships to create a permanent library of games available to everyone at Campus Canoas. This library is being formed from donations and games that are built by the scholarship holders and the project coordinator. We also applied a questionnaire that aims to collect data, with the purpose of verifying which areas of knowledge could be integrated into the project and also has enabled the development of some of the intelligences by the participating students. From the data collected in 2016, 2017 and 2018, it is possible to verify the potential of modern board games, such as 78.8% of the students who participated in the respective years, noticed a development of the contents of the academic training. Already intelligence that was more perceived by the students, was the logic-mathematical intelligence with 34.7%, that is in the games practiced, it was the intelligence most perceived by the students. However, it is necessary to collect and deepen the analysis of the same, which is the next step of the project.
Ponce Campuzano Juan Carlos The University of Queensland Australia
A dynamic and interactive introduction to the world of mathematics
 
In this presentation I will talk about the design and use of dynamic and interactive GeoGebra applets for introducing concepts of mathematics for all ages.
Russo Cecilia Johannes Kepler University Uruguay An overview of gamification and gamified educational platforms Zsolt Lavicza
Gamification is being increasingly present in our daily lives and the use of gamification in education is raising the attention of teachers and researches to enhance students’ motivation for learning. While students live in a highly technological environment, thus, it would be necessary to adapt our teaching and learning approaches to students’ current reality. Technology can offer us opportunities to easily gamify learning and to enhance students’ motivation. As the first step of our research, a literature review about gamification was carried out. During our literature review, we identified main topics related to gamification such as games elements, player types. We also found topics that show the motivational power of gamification, especially on education. Finally, we review some gamified educational platforms. The result of our literature review and the relation between the topics founded as well as the platforms review will be reported in this presentation.
Schallert Stefanie JKU Linz Austria Developing flipped learning environments for tackling mathematics education at the secondary level Robert Weinhandl
Although teaching according to a flipped classroom approach is being increasingly used in schools, it is still the case that this type of education is often teacher-driven, and that teachers play a dominant role in terms of determining learning objectives and materials. Recently, the definition of flipped classrooms is being changed, accordingly the approach is becoming more student-driven and teachers mostly start to play supportive roles. Thus, this new approach is currently referred to as the flipped learning approach. The aim of our research is to identify central elements for students when learning mathematics in flipped learning environments. Furthermore, we focus on the characteristics and the development of flipped learning materials.
Schallert Stefanie JKU Linz Austria
Implementing augmented reality activities in flipped classroom environments to enable inquiry-based learning in STEM education
 
In traditional flipped classroom environments students have to watch videos prior to class and the in-class phase is used for different student-centered activities. But rather than simply presenting established facts or worked-out examples, the learning process in a flipped mathematics classroom can also be initiated with posing questions or problems and thus foster inquiry-based learning. According to Blooms taxonomy inquiry-based learning is fundamental for the development of higher order thinking. Only a few studies are available on how to design learning activities in a flipped classroom that encourage higher-order conceptual thinking. Furthermore, there is a lack of research highlighting how augmented reality learning activities can be part of flipped classroom environments. In my presentation I will display different flipped classroom scenarios where students through augmented reality activities have the opportunity to develop new knowledge that builds on their prior knowledge.
Shillo Roi Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Israel Identify Creative Leaps to Encourage Creative Thinking Kobi Gal, Zsolt Lavicza
Identify and find Creative leaps in 2D Geometry task based on Machine Learning models.
Trappmair Andreas JKU Linz Austria
AR adoption in Austrian maths education - an outline of future research projects
 
Augmented Reality (AR) has become a hot topic in educational research in the past few years. There are various studies showing the value of the usage of different kinds of AR systems concerning multiple educational aspects like for example the learner's outcome (motivation, achievements, attitude or enhanced spatial abilities of students). However, studies on Austrian students seem to be missing almost entirely. In this talk I will give a short overwiew of recent studies regarding the use of AR in STEM education and adumbrate my plans for my PhD projects on this topic briefly.
Vass Vilmos Budapest Metropolitan University Hungary Support for bulding students' portfolio: the role of divergent and start-up thinking in creativity Dr. Ferenc Kiss  
Vitabar Fabián JKU Uruguay

Gamification in professional development for STEAM education

 

Promoting creativity and STEAM in schools is a great challenge, mostly because traditional pedagogies are difficult to be modified. New styles of interaction are required to offer students and teachers more flexible educational environments, so they can address their own interests and make choices. Gamification can solve many of these issues, not only in the classrooms, but also in professional development activities. In this talk we will share a few experiences about using game elements in professional development workshops.

Zöchbauer Johanna JKU Austria Live Session  
Connected classroom systems are used by teachers to assign work to students and to give them immediate feedback to their responses. The live session feature can be used to support students individual thinking and foster their creativity. In this talk I will show some examples how to use the live session feature with connected classroom technology and I will also give a short overview about my project on this topic.

 

 

 

 

Gamification, integrating game elements into learning process, seems to be one of the most popular teaching methods nowadays. It has a wide application area, starting from elementary school to higher education, including online classes. Its potential could be valued for improving learning outcomes, for assessment, as well as for solving educational administrative issues. The aim of this talk is to take a closer look at existing research in order to understand the effect of gamification in education and to be aware of the game elements which can take place in gamification design. Supported with implication examples, the talk will include the design of gamified learning environments in accordance with player types. The talk will end by questioning the assumed underlying learning theory and evaluation of gamification considering the 21st-century student standards.      

Possible Uses of Gamification in Education

Martin Andre Pedagogical University Tyrol & JKU Austria Visualizations make data meaningful: Technologies in modern statistics education Martin Andre  
Graphical representations of data facilitate revealing and exploring hidden phenomena that can not be discovered without statistical lenses. Making data meaningful implies illustrating complex relationships with clearness and simplicity. In our data society, it is commonly agreed that communication skills, creativity and innovation as well as critical-thinking and problem-solving, with a focus on processing information, are crucial components for citizenship in the 21st century. Therefore, modern statistics education must contribute to give coherent responses to the developments in the digital age. In this presentation, examples and good practices of current and future concepts to integrate data visualization of Open Data in secondary school education will be highlighted. In addition, directions for further development and research in this field will be outlined. Moreover, approaches to statistics education beyond conventional boundaries are depicted. Finally, with a focus on methods to visually analyse real data, connections between graphical representations of data and intuitive understanding of statistical concepts are drawn.
Noah (Thierry) Dana-Picard Jerusalem College of Technology Israel Computer assisted activities about the Golden Ratio in Space and Time Noah Dana-Picard Sara Hershkovitz
The Golden Ratio appears not only in plane geometrical settings. It appears in spatial structure and in time related topics. We present CAS and DGS assisted activities with in-service and pre-service teachers in various settings, some of them are connected to space exploration.
Sara Hershkovitz Center for Educational Technology, Tel Aviv Israel Computer assisted activities about the Golden Ratio in Space and Time Sara Hershkovitz Noah (Thierry) Dana-Picard
The Golden Ratio appears not only in plane geometrical settings. It appears in spatial structure and in time related topics. We present CAS and DGS assisted activities with in-service and pre-service teachers in various settings, some of them are connected to space exploration.
Elizabeth Crilly Leeds University England Competence Profiles of Physicists Elizabeth Crilly None To be submitted
Corinna Kröhn JKU Austria Modeling as a brain-based and creative learning strategy Corinna Kröhn B. Sabitzer, K. Otto, M. Rottenhofer, C. Kröhn, H. Demarle-Meusel
Effective learning is always an active process where students should create and construct theirknowledge themselves. To support this independent work, creative strategies for elaborating,structuring, visualizing and memorizing learning contents are welcome in every domain. They areespecially useful in subjects considered as difficult or for students with learning difficulties. MindMaps and Advanced Organizers are familiar tools for visualization. Modeling is one of thesecreative learning strategies, with the benefit, that it is additionally fostering digital literacy andcomputational thinking. In this paper, we focus on modeling with diagrams used as learningstrategy. These diagrams originally come from the field of computer science, where modeling is acrucial concept and visualizing technique. We mainly use diagrams of the Unified ModelingLanguage (UML), a graphic modeling language used in software engineering. With UML diagramsit is possible to cover respectively visualize a broad range of situations and learning purposesacross all subjects from primary up to secondary education. Our research focuses on detectingthose diagrams that are most useful and practicable for teachers and learners without computerscience background. The paper introduces the use of modeling as brain-based learning strategyand describes which models and diagrams can be used for which purpose and in which context inorder to support and enrich learning and teaching in different subjects. Besides giving somecreative ideas and best practice examples for primary and lower secondary education, the papersummarizes qualitative results gained up to now, which build the basis for our new internationalproject “Modeling at School”. Finally, we give an outlook on this project, its research focus andsome preliminary results.

Keywords: Learning strategies, advance organizer, computational thinking, problem solving,creative learning, text comprehensio
Robert Weinhandl JKU Linz Österreich see Stefanie Schallert Stefanie Schallert Robert Weinhandl
see Stefanie Schallert
Marina Rottenhofer JKU Linz AT
Modeling as a creative teaching & learning tool
 
Corinna Kröhn, Korbinian Otto, Marina Rottenhofer
 
Dominic Oakes FMSP Wales/Swansea University UK Bringing a connected curriculum to life Dominic Oakes  
Programmes of Study tend to work through specifications topic by topic. Can we improve on this in developing mathematical thinking by looking at the connections in the material and travelling through the mathematics in a different way? FMSP Wales have written SoWs for the new Mathematics & Further Mathematics A-Levels. We have mapped prior & dependent topics for every topic in the syllabi. Can we use this resource to grow our students' (& teachers') understanding of the patterns running through mathematics?

Our MindMap is complicated - it has to be printed on A0 paper to be at all legible! We are now working with Glyndwr University to develop a 3-D version of the MindMap. We are working towards using the Unreal Game Engine to allow students and teachers to travel through the curriculum. This will also allow the opportunity to develop games within the connected curriculum.
Peter Galambos Óbuda University Hungary A Serious Game for Schoolchild and Engineers: Programming Industrial Robots with Blockly Péter Galambos János Tobik
Programming robots are quite appealing when motivating children to learn coding. For this reason, several frameworks appeared that introduces the fundamental programming concepts through visual components. Blockly is an open source project of Google, which provides a flexible and generic tool to implement customized graphical programming environments for any purpose, for example, programming tiny toy robots.

But why only toys could be operated through such a visual environment? Visual frameworks could be equally useful and efficient for developing programs for real industrial robots.

In my talk, I introduce the initial results of our project that is aimed at providing a Blockly-based programming framework for the popular Universal Robots industrial manipulators. The system consists of a web-based composer and a 3D simulator powered by MaxWhere. The original URSim virtual controller performs the execution of the robot program.
Stefanie Schallert JKU Linz Austria Developing flipped learning environments for tackling mathematics education at the secondary level Stefanie Schallert Robert Weinhandl
Although teaching according to a flipped classroom approach is being increasingly used in schools, it is still the case that this type of education is often teacher-driven, and that teachers play a dominant role in terms of determining learning objectives and materials. Recently, the definition of flipped classrooms is being changed, accordingly the approach is becoming more student-driven and teachers mostly start to play supportive roles. Thus, this new approach is currently referred to as the flipped learning approach. The aim of our research is to identify central elements for students when learning mathematics in flipped learning environments. Furthermore, we focus on the characteristics and the development of flipped learning materials.
Giulia Bini Università degli Studi di Torino Italia Creativity in class: mathematical memes as tools to initiate learning Giulia Bini Ornella Robutti
The aim of this project is to explore the didactic affordances of memes (humorous digital objects, created by users and shared virally on the web) as cultural artefacts to learn mathematics, within the theoretical frameworks of boundary objects, commognition, and emotions in learning.
Due to their creative and involving nature, we can imagine diverse educational uses of memes: knowledge review, collective discussion, flipped classroom, inclusive teaching among others.
This study aims to observe the didactic affordances of the image memes, focusing on their use as tools to systematize knowledge, with attention to cognitive and non-cognitive aspects, such as the effects of the openness to humour, creativity and emotions in a subject traditionally distant from these elements and of the updating of the teacher-student relationship, thanks to the two-way exchange triggered by memes (teachers learning memes while students learning maths).
To reach our purpose, we have conceived a replicable teaching experience where students create multimedia learning objects that, starting from memes, range over several representational registers of a selected mathematical concept: a short video, which has the didactic purpose of eliciting the mathematical content, and a symbolic or graphic representation of the same content, created using GeoGebra.
The scaffolding to replicate this teaching experience will be shared in the conference, hoping to engage teachers and colleagues to join us in our journey in this unexplored field.
Natalija Budinski JKU Serbia Mathematics, origami and technology in education based on creativity and innovations Natalija Budinski  
It is evident that we need new educational strategies in order to prepare students for the technology based future. In this presentation we highlight innovative ideas of unconventional combination of disciplines, such as mathematics, origami and technology in the classroom. We share experience and observations gained during implementation of origami in teaching mathematics and technology, where we conveyed not only desired content, but developed their creativity as well.
Kristof Fenyvesi University of Jyväskylä Finland Nurturing Collaborative Creativities and Innovation by Phenomenon-based Approach in STEAM Learning Kristóf Fenyvesi  
The presentation will introduce some of our on-going projects, which are addressing the advancement of creative approaches and innovative communities in the school. The perspectives and attitudes, methods, technologies and learning tools developed by the Everyday Creativity E+ (https://creativeschools.eu/), the STIMEY H2020 (www.stimey.eu) and the Checkpoint Leonardo Network (https://www.jyu.fi/science/fi/luma/hankkeet/checkpoint-leonardo-network) Finnish national project are intended to enhance collaboration, motivation and engagement and contribute to innovative learning environments (https://www.jyu.fi/it/en/research/research-areas/cognitive-science-and-educational-technology/ile).
Bjarnheiður Kristinsdóttir University of Iceland Iceland Toward a definition of silent video tasks Bea Kristinsdóttir  
In my talk I will describe the development process of assigning silent video tasks and the criteria a video must fulfill to be eligible to be used as a silent video task. Some preliminary results regarding the use of silent video tasks in four different Icelandic upper secondary school mathematics classrooms were presented at the last Linz STEAM Education conferences, at PME42 in Umeå and at MEDA in Copenhagen in 2018. These presentations were focused on, respectively, creativity, the teachers’ role in assigning tasks and using technology in mathematics classrooms. During the discussion at these conferences, it became clear that a more precise definition of the silent videos and the silent video tasks was needed. This presentation presents results of further work towards such definitions.
Stefanie Schallert JKU Linz Austria Implementing augmented reality activities in flipped classroom environments to enable inquiry-based learning in STEM education
Stefanie Schallert
 
In traditional flipped classroom environments students have to watch videos prior to class and the in-class phase is used for different student-centered activities. But rather than simply presenting established facts or worked-out examples, the learning process in a flipped mathematics classroom can also be initiated with posing questions or problems and thus foster inquiry-based learning. According to Blooms taxonomy inquiry-based learning is fundamental for the development of higher order thinking. Only a few studies are available on how to design learning activities in a flipped classroom that encourage higher-order conceptual thinking. Furthermore, there is a lack of research highlighting how augmented reality learning activities can be part of flipped classroom environments. In my presentation I will display different flipped classroom scenarios where students through augmented reality activities have the opportunity to develop new knowledge that builds on their prior knowledge.
Juan Carlos Ponce Campuzano The University of Queensland Australia A dynamic and interactive introduction to the world of mathematics
Juan Carlos Ponce Campuzano
 
In this presentation I will talk about the design and use of dynamic and interactive GeoGebra applets for introducing concepts of mathematics for all ages.
Roi Shillo Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Israel Identify Creative Leaps to Encourage Creative Thinking Roi Shillo Kobi Gal, Zsolt Lavicza
Identify and find Creative leaps in 2D Geometry task based on Machine Learning models.
Kalman Bekesi Educational Authority Budapest Hungary How Written Curricula Or Teaching Resources Can Support Effective Science Teaching: Indicators Kalman Bekesi Balazs Szalay, Ildiko Balazsi, Agnes Lak
Besides the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts, there are generic skills that are of growing importance. Some claim that general or transversal skills ensure the ability to expertise in a new field quickly therefore their importance is greater than the content of any curriculum. Among others, such skills are asking questions, testing assumptions, constructing knowledge by collaborating with peers or being able to reflect on their own thinking by metacognition. Still, curricula and textbooks are important mediator of not only content but expectations of transversal skills as well. Textbooks still play key role in top-down educational reforms (Pepin et al., 2013)

However, the original research question was not about generic skills. We started looking for learning and teaching strategies and methods that are proven (by research evidence) to have a positive effect on student. An extensive and systematic literature review has been conducted on quantitative or mixed, meta-studies and large-scale studies, published in English globally. At this point we have processed about 1000 articles which represent more than 16000 hits on the systematic online search lists (by stratified sampling). Our search included terms like “effectiveness”, “systematic review”, “effect size”, “science teaching” and “secondary school”. The full list contained a systematically mapped out list of relevant search terms and search operators.

The majority of the publications were about improving generic or transversal skills and thus affecting students’ test results rather than particular concepts, knowledge and understanding in science. The approach to teaching strategies and techniques is whether they are proven to support these generic skills.

Our research question is “What pedagogies should be presented and implied in national and local curricula as well as teaching and learning resources to support these effective strategies, techniques or methods?” Our indicators reflect much more on generic and transversal skills improvement than on specific content of physics or chemistry. This research doesn’t intend to cover all possible generic and transversal skills but only those that are quantitatively proven to contribute to measurable student performance.

In the Linz Gamification and Creativity in STEAM Education Conference on 17-18 January 2019, I am going to present some of the preliminary findings. We have coded and analysed science national curricula (England and Wales, and Hungary). We also have processed data from textbooks and teachers’ guides. The interpretation of data was conducted along a) discovery learning (constructivist pedagogies) vs. structured teaching (behaviouristic pedagogies), b) metacognitive skills, and c) cognitive domains. These aspects of analysis also reflect on some cross-dimensions such as collaborative learning, problem-solving techniques and self-regulated or independent learning.

First results show that curricula have turned to a constructivist direction but try to keep behaviouristic traditions as well. A combination of the two is also suggested by literature (Furtak et al., 2012) However, they don’t always follow those pedagogies consistently that the mass of empirical literature suggests as “most effective ways”. On one hand, curricula don’t always include all the necessary learning objectives that may – for example – lead to understanding the nature of science, but only some elements of it. On the second hand, it is not always clear whether progressive elements written in curricular expectations are separate or they work as a system of expectations increasing each other’s impact on students’ skills. Textbooks and other resources we analysed also represent an intention to turn towards constructivist learning with similar strengths and weaknesses as curricula do.

Referenced Literature
Pepin, B., Gueudet, G. és Trouche, L. (2013) Investigating Textbooks as Crucial Interfaces Between Culture, Policy and Teacher Curricular Practice: Two Contrasted Case Studies in France and Norway. ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 45 (5), 685-698.
Furtak, E. M., Seidel, T., Iverson, H., & Briggs, D. C. (2012) Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching: A Meta-Analysis. Review of Educational Research. [Online] 82 (3), 300–329.
Eduardo Pompermayer Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio Grande do Sul - Canoas Brasil Modern Board Games: Developing Multiple Intelligence Eduardo Pompermayer João Emilio Soares Michalski
Howard Gardner, an American psychologist, published the book Structures of Mind (1983) which shows, without opposing the scientific concepts of intelligence that there are seven models of intelligence. He further states in his theory that these intelligences could be developed and explored equally. They are visual and spatial intelligence, musical intelligence, linguistics, intelligence logical-mathematical intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, and bodily or kinesthetic intelligence. In the current Brazilian education system, students are developed and demanded, preferably linguistic intelligence and logical-mathematical intelligence, making it difficult to develop other intelligences that are of equivalent importance to others. Because of this, the Games Workshop, which is in its third year, seeks to develop through multiple board games, the exercise of multiple intelligences, with IFRS Campus Canoas students, for future professional and personal lives. The workshop happens once a week with a duration of 3 hours, always in the reverse shift. The counselor and the scholarship holders previously choose the games for each meeting. These are selected in order to work on some of the intelligences and also, whenever possible, that they have some theme related to the contents of propedeutic disciplines present in the curricula of the integrated courses. For example, we have that some games may be cooperative, so we can work interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. In addition, the project has sought to make games become part of the day-to-day life of the institution. For this, we have sought partnerships to create a permanent library of games available to everyone at Campus Canoas. This library is being formed from donations and games that are built by the scholarship holders and the project coordinator. We also applied a questionnaire that aims to collect data, with the purpose of verifying which areas of knowledge could be integrated into the project and also has enabled the development of some of the intelligences by the participating students. From the data collected in 2016, 2017 and 2018, it is possible to verify the potential of modern board games, such as 78.8% of the students who participated in the respective years, noticed a development of the contents of the academic training. Already intelligence that was more perceived by the students, was the logic-mathematical intelligence with 34.7%, that is in the games practiced, it was the intelligence most perceived by the students. However, it is necessary to collect and deepen the analysis of the same, which is the next step of the project.
Branko Andjic University of Montenegro Montenegro Dichotomous key as teaching tools for developing the student's creativity in primary school Branko Andjic  
The huge number of research are confirmed the positive effect of implementation of the dichotomous keys (DK) on students achievement in biology. However, still are very rare research which examines the students' ability to create DK. In this research, the students were asked to create the DK's for several organisms from their surroundings. The result shows the DK as a part of Inquiry-based education involves basic processes that give rise to student’s creativity. The student’s which used DK are showed more different approach in identification organism’s from the surrounding’s as well as in creating the DK than student which the same content was learned on the traditional way.
Diego Lieban IFRS-Brazil / JKU-Austria Brazil Creating with 3D printing: linking physical and digital ways of learning Diego Lieban  
We intend to share a range of perspectives in using 3D printing as educational tool considering related pedagogies and the benefits of digital and physical resources connection. From game design to daily-life problem solving demands, our main goal is to spread some ideas highlighting the creative process and learning opportunities. The use of manipulative, as well as such approaches that favor different learning modes will be outlined.
Cecilia Russo Johannes Kepler University Uruguay An overview of gamification and gamified educational platforms Cecilia Russo Zsolt Lavicza
Gamification is being increasingly present in our daily lives and the use of gamification in education is raising the attention of teachers and researches to enhance students’ motivation for learning. While students live in a highly technological environment, thus, it would be necessary to adapt our teaching and learning approaches to students’ current reality. Technology can offer us opportunities to easily gamify learning and to enhance students’ motivation. As the first step of our research, a literature review about gamification was carried out. During our literature review, we identified main topics related to gamification such as games elements, player types. We also found topics that show the motivational power of gamification, especially on education. Finally, we review some gamified educational platforms. The result of our literature review and the relation between the topics founded as well as the platforms review will be reported in this presentation.
Andreas Trappmair JKU Linz Austria AR adoption in Austrian maths education - an outline of future research projects
Andreas Trappmair
 
Augmented Reality (AR) has become a hot topic in educational research in the past few years. There are various studies showing the value of the usage of different kinds of AR systems concerning multiple educational aspects like for example the learner's outcome (motivation, achievements, attitude or enhanced spatial abilities of students). However, studies on Austrian students seem to be missing almost entirely. In this talk I will give a short overwiew of recent studies regarding the use of AR in STEM education and adumbrate my plans for my PhD projects on this topic briefly.
Johanna Zöchbauer JKU Austria Live Session
Johanna Zöchbauer
 
Connected classroom systems are used by teachers to assign work to students and to give them immediate feedback to their responses. The live session feature can be used to support students individual thinking and foster their creativity. In this talk I will show some examples how to use the live session feature with connected classroom technology and I will also give a short overview about my PhD project.
Valentyna Pikalova National Technical University "Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute" (NTU "KhPI") Украина STEAM project: Exploring and Modelling Ukrainian Embroidery
Valentyna Pikalova
 
In the STEAM project students explore traditional forms of Ukrainian embroidery and design new one with the help of GeoGebra and Python. One group of students works with GeoGebra in order to focus on exploring patterns through math topics involved: symmetry, geometrical transformation, tessellation etc. As a result we designed GeoGebra program with the set of tools to model unique patterns of Ukrainian embroidery. Another group focused on exploring repeating patterns in embroidery. As a result students designed embroidery generator program in Python, which models step-by-step process of implementing different cross stitch techniques to chosen pattern using turtle graphics Python library.
Clemens Jaeger JKU Linz Austria Supporting children from socio-economic disadvantaged homes with free private coaching following the principles of Deliberate Practise Clemens Jaeger  
In all countries and economies that participated in PISA 2015, socio-economic status has a large influence on students’ performance in science, reading and mathematics. The gap in science scores between disadvantaged and advantaged 15-year-old students represents the equivalent of about three full years of schooling. One suggested approach to help mitigate the problem is that people in local communities provide after-school remedial support for students in need. Some of the recommendations of how this coaching should be conducted show similarities to the concept of "Deliberate Practise (DP)", which was developed by Anders Ericsson. The insights of his studies of professional expertise range from the characteristics of ideal training environments with teachers and coaches, to the methods of fostering motivation by providing emotional support and attainable training tasks of a suitable difficulty level. The aim of the talk is to present the planned PhD thesis, that wants to analyse successful initiatives (for example “JUMP Math” in Canada) and the scientific background of DP to design a training (possibly including gamification techniques) for voluntary coaches who are going to provide tutoring to children from socio-economic disadvantaged homes.
Korbinian Otto JKU Austria modelling for discovery learning Korbinian Otto Barbara Sabitzer, Marina Rottenhofer
The human brain is an amazing pattern-recognition machine. We already start using pattern recognition before kindergarten, like building toy houses, and use it later in our daily life, such as reading the bus map. Models are using patterns to simplify complex processes and relations for example, complicated bonds between big companies and their affiliated companies or charts for different operations on complex machines. The authors are using four different key models, which were the most viable types to teach a great variety of topics at different school subjects using pattern recognition. To create a model of a complex subject, a student needs to cull all the necessary information, has to understand the relations and/or processes and to make a coherent model out of the data. If there is a pending test, the student can use his model to get the necessary information without reading the whole chapter again. This paper presents the most important models, how they can be used in school, the selection procedure of choosing the accurate model for the subject and examples of the recently completed workshops at a secondary school in Linz.

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